PSP50916 Diploma of Interpreting (LOTE-English)

 

CRICOS CODE:

091828B

Description:

This qualification covers the competencies required to interpret from a source language to a target language, in general dialogue and monologue settings where the interpreter is able to physically control the discourse to assist retention and recall.

In a general setting the context is usually broad and routine, the content or complexity of the situation can usually be predicted and planned for. There are typically two or a few participants, to whom the interpreter has physical and visual access.

The Diploma of Interpreting prepares interpreters for work typically in the community and business domains, including sectors such as general health, welfare and community services, educational and social contexts, and tourism. As well as interactions such as initial police interviews, over the counter-interviews in customer and community information services, non-complex disability assistance, and other informal business and workplace interactions. The interpreting takes place where miscommunication or the consequences of errors in communicative intent can be readily managed through consultation and preparation, and where there are opportunities for error correction.

Available languages: Mandarin; Korean

Program Structure:

Students will be introduced to the profession of interpreting and led to explore various contextual areas that interpreters work in. You will be trained to analyse, recall and reproduce source language message in the target language in general settings, applying effective linguistic transfer skills and discourse management strategies. Through classes, workshops and various guided group and individual learning activities, you will practise your interpreting skills, whilst also gaining an appreciation of professional ethics and industry knowledge that is essential to your future career.

Course Quick Guide:

Delivery mode: On-campus
Duration: 24 weeks (including 4 weeks of holidays)
Location: Garden City campus

Assessment Method: Short answer questions and written essay, simulated workplace assessment, role play and oral questioning.

Intake dates

Mandarin class
27/11/2017

Korean class
TBA

Specific Training Package requirements including entry requirements:

International students:
1. Mandarin & English – NAATI Approved
– Achieving a minimum level of academic qualification equivalent to an Australian Year 11 high school certificate; OR
– Passing HETC’s internal academic entry test
– Achieving as IELTS (or accepted equivalent) score of 6.0 with Listening and Speaking components no lower than 6.0, Reading and Writing components no lower than 5.5 within the past two years; OR
– Passing HETC’s English entry test

2. Korean & English – NAATI Approved
– Achieving a minimum level of academic qualification equivalent to an Australian Year 11 high school certificate; OR
– Passing HETC’s internal academic entry test
– Achieving as IELTS (or accepted equivalent) score of 6.0 with Listening and Speaking components no lower than 6.0, Reading and Writing components no lower than 5.5 within the past two years; OR
– Passing HETC’s English entry test

Qualification Requirements:

Total number of units: 12 (7 core units, no more than 1 unit from Group A and 4 elective units)

CORE UNITS
PSPTIS001 Apply codes and standards to ethical practice
PSPTIS002 Build glossaries for translating and interpreting assignments
PSPTIS003 Prepare to translate and interpret
PSPTIS040 Interpret in general dialogue settings (LOTE-English)
PSPTIS041 Interpret in general monologue settings (LOTE-English)
PSPTIS042 Manage discourses in general settings
PSPTIS043 (LOTE-English) Use routine subject area terminology in interpreting (LOTE-English

GROUP A
SITXLAN3115 Conduct oral communication in a language other than English (Mandarin) / SITXLAN3113 Conduct oral communication in a language other than English (Korean)

ELECTIVES
PSPTIS046 Use routine education terminology in interpreting (LOTE-English)
PSPTIS047 Use routine health terminology in interpreting (LOTE-English)
PSPTIS048 Use routine legal terminology in interpreting (LOTE-English)
BSBDIV301 Work effectively with diversity

 

Course Price :

All prices are in Australian Dollars (AUD)
Students can pay via cash, EFTPOS, direct deposit (preferred) or bank cheques.

International Please refer to International Prospectus for pricing.

The role of NAATI and its relationship to HETC

National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters (NAATI) is the national standards and accreditation body for translators and interpreters in Australia. It is the only agency to issue accreditations for practitioners who wish to work in these professions in Australia.
This qualification at HETC holds NAATI approval, students who complete the qualification and assessment at the standard required by NAATI may apply for NAATI accreditation without further testing by NAATI.

What NAATI accreditation means

NAATI accreditation is an acknowledgement that an individual has demonstrated the ability to meet the professional standards required by the translation and interpreting industry. NAATI Accreditation is generally required by agencies as a prerequisite for employment as an interpreter or a translator.

What HETC is required to do to maintain its NAATI accreditation

HETC fulfils the following requirements in order to maintain its partnership with NAATI:
– The course must be offered by a Registered Training Organisation (RTO)
– The course must be listed on the RTO’s scope.
– The course proposed for NAATI approval must either be a nationally accredited course or part of a nationally recognised training package.
– Should HETC intend to enrol international students on the approved course, then it must be CRICOS registered and the course must be listed for delivery against this registration.
– Compliance with conditions of approval
– Submit Application for NAATI Course Re-Approval prior to its expiry

How NAATI accredited examinations will be conducted (e.g. such as dialogue examinations), including the role NAATI plays in the conduct of these examinations

The unit PSPTIS040 Interpret in general dialogue settings (LOTE-English) is the assessment linked to NAATI Recommendation. NAATI recognises the unit PSPTIS040 Interpret in general dialogue settings (LOTE-English) as meeting the requirements for the interpreting dialogue exam. HETC conducts this exam on behalf of NAATI. Students who pass the exam will be recommended for NAATI accreditation, and must apply directly to NAATI to be awarded their accreditation.

HETC is required to follow NAATI Examiners Manual as its Diploma of Interpreting is a NAATI approved course.

How NAATI accredited subjects will be assessed, including the role NAATI plays in the conduct of these assessments

All dialogue exams must be marked by at least two markers, one of which is appointed by NAATI. Each marker works independently of the other to ensure fair and unbiased marking.
When there is a pass/fail discrepancy or significant marks difference between the two initial markers, a third marker may be engaged the dialogue exam result will be determined by the third marker as per the NAATI Guide.

Students’ review rights to challenge assessments through NAATI and/or HETC, and to obtain details of assessment outcomes through NAATI and/or HETC, as appropriate

HETC is required to follow NAATI’s policies on students’ review rights to challenge the dialogue exam result outcome. When there is a pass/fail discrepancy or significant marks difference between the two initial markers, a third marker may be involved. When two markers have both awarded a Fail grade to a student, neither HETC nor the student may not request for a third marker, as stated by NAATI’s policy. Students can request for an overall report on performance on the test, including an explanation of the reasons for failure. Students will be informed of their dialogue exam grades via an email from HETC once the markers have concluded their marking process.

Students’ rights to appeal decisions made by NAATI

Students can appeal to NAATI through HETC against the result of the dialogue exam on the grounds of procedural irregularities. Such irregularities may have occurred before, during or after a test, and could include:
– the student not having received information about the test dates or times, the test format, or test instructions; or
– technical problems with playing the audio file or recording the student’s responses.
Students must provide substantive proof of such procedural irregularities at the time of seeking an appeal. Appeals will not be considered if they are based on the academic judgement of a marker.